Fetishism

Blog 1

Karl Marx’s idea of Capitalism leads to the notion of commodity fetishism, which is the idea of the object losing its use-value because the consumer starts believing it has a more essential value.

I agree with this idea of fetishism because we treat commodities as necessities. Phones, computers, cars, clothing almost everything gets old. As consumers we enter a cycle of purchasing newer things. Back in the days, things were fixed not thrown out or replaced. I work at a car dealership and I witness this idea of fetishism constantly. If a person’s car starts to “act up” they’re always ready to trade it in for something else especially if coincidentally there is a newer model. We have come to a point where materialistic objects matter more than things that actually have value. I found this image and found it particularly funny but sadly true. This elderly woman has fallen and instead of the crowd helping the woman they are interested in the man’s iphone. This image might exaggerate a bit but it presents the notion of the value of a commodity being more important than a person’s well being.

Advertisements

5 responses to “Fetishism

  1. Im not sure why my picture didnt upload.
    here is the link:

  2. Apple products are a great example of commodity fetishism. Their products are over priced and you can find a device that works just as well or even better, cheaper. Yet, many people are lining up to buy their latest products. Why? Because others have them, so they need/want it too (plus they look cool and since so many people have it, they MUST be the best brand, right?). Thus, the “value” of Apple products go up and by having these high valued products somehow raises your own “value” will go up too.

    I agree with your statement about how people are quick to throw out things — things that can be easily fixed. Again, I can’t help but use Apple as an example. To be honest, Apple has a great business scheme. I can relate to this “wanting to throw out xyz because of scratch on the screen” feeling and having posters surrounding me with pictures of newer products, why keep the current one I have?

  3. ^- that is my first comment

    And just to fix an ungrammatical sentence, what I meant to say in the first paragraph was, “and by having these high valued products, somehow your own “value” will go up too.”

  4. I agree with Andrea and Dana. Andrea- I think it’s interesting how you said, “If a person’s car starts to “act up” they’re always ready to trade it in for something else especially if coincidentally there is a newer model.” It’s a bit fascinating how a person would give a car back just because of a little problem it may have. I’ve had many cars before that get low tire pressure, or a squeaky noise when reversing, but I would never have the patience to go replace it for a new one just because of the few little issues. I’m pretty sure you get charged for giving a lease back earlier as well. It shows how much people praise their commodities. It’s almost like the car is their “baby”. Dana – I like your example about Apple products. I was mostly interested by: “Thus, the “value” of Apple products go up and by having these high valued products somehow raises your own “value” will go up too.” It’s interesting how you said our OWN value goes up because sadly, that is true. People with blackberry’s now-a-days get laughed at for having an old phone.

  5. Great post, I have to admit most of my friends fall into the category if something goes wrong with a product don’t fix it just replace it. The iPhones for example once a new one comes out, people treat their phones like their worthless. That they find the smallest flaws in their old phones so that they can get a new one. My first cell phone lasted me five years and it cost me $50 these new iPhones come out every year costing up to $700 and people are rushing to buy them. This couldn’t be a better example of commodity fetishism.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s